G Suite vs. Office 365 cloud collaboration battle heats up

CIOs and IT managers are increasingly adopting Microsoft’s Office 365 and Google’s G Suite for collaboration, productivity and messaging. These cloud-based productivity suites are expanding, gaining new feature sets and new apps for enterprise users. Earlier this month, both Google and Microsoft introduced chat-based collaboration apps to reposition for competition in this fast evolving and hotly contested space.

Microsoft’s Teams, which has been in beta since November, was released for general availability for Office 365 customers. And Google introduced a rebuilt Hangouts, which has been split into two apps — Hangouts Chat for chat-based communications and Hangouts Meet for audio and video conferencing.

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Network World Cloud Computing

9 top tools for corporate cloud collaboration

The nature of work has evolved rapidly during the last few years. Modern coworkers often have very different roles and responsibilities, and many work from multiple locations. Email is no longer an efficient tool for many of the tasks today’s professionals perform, and face-to-face meetings are increasingly a rarity.

Fortunately, a new generation of cloud-based collaboration tools are now available to help tackle some of these challenges. Here’s a look at nine of the best options.

1. Toggl for time tracking

If you’ve been turned off by the complexity of past time-tracking solutions, Toggl may be a better fit. The great-looking time tracker works in a web browser, and it’s an intuitive tool that helps monitor your productivity. Toggl works offline, too, and it automatically syncs time tracked offline the next time it connects to the web.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Intralinks adds security layers for high value content collaboration using SharePoint and other systems  

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 Recently I was engaged by a large corporation for a writing project to support a product launch. This project had a small team of people who needed to collaborate on developing some promotional materials using content that had to remain confidential until launch day.

The company was so protective of the content’s secrecy that it provided me with a company-issued laptop computer, VPN access to their network, and a login ID for their network. In particular, I was given behind-the-firewall access to the SharePoint repository where the in-progress documents were kept. This way I was fully integrated into the internal team for the duration of the project, and the confidential documents would never have to leave the safety of the company’s network.

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Network World Cloud Computing