IDG Contributor Network: Making a business case for Alexa

I have been fascinated with the idea of a personal voice assistant since the day Amazon made their Echo devices available. Once in awhile I come back to it, try to write another skill, see what is new. I published a couple of articles on the topic. I struggle to find a good use case for a business application. A lot of it has to do with technical limitations.

On February 23, 2017, Amazon published a blog post celebrating over 10,000 skills. The good news is that this is a three-fold increase since September of 2016. The bad news is that the majority of the skills are solutions in search of problems.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

3 key factors missing from your cloud business case

You want to justify some IT spending for cloud-based platforms. Your CEO or board has asked for a business case, and you’ve been scrambling to create one. Of course, you’ll include obvious items like capex versus opex. However, most business cases miss three important concepts:

1. The value of agility

Yes, again. The problem with agility in a business case is that it’s hard to define, as well as hard to assign a dollar figure. Agility rarely gets into cloud business cases.

But agility should always be considered in a cloud business case, even if in the abstract. If you can scale a server cluster in seconds without driving hardware and software buying cycles, what is that worth to the business? In most cases, I suspect it’s worth a lot.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft invokes Supreme Court opinion in Ireland email case

Microsoft believes its refusal to turn over email held in Ireland to the U.S. government got a boost from an opinion of the Supreme Court on Monday, which upheld that U.S. laws cannot apply extraterritorially unless Congress has explicitly provided for it.

In a decision Monday in a separate case on the extraterritorial application of a provision of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), the Supreme Court set out the ground rules for its analysis, pointing out that “absent clearly expressed congressional intent to the contrary, federal laws will be construed to have only domestic application.” The court was applying a canon of statutory construction known as the presumption against extraterritoriality.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing