What’s behind VMware’s Wavefront acquisition?

VMware’s acquisition of monitoring software maker Wavefront for an undisclosed sum is a move core to VMware’s strategy to round out its portfolio for facilitating and managing hybrid cloud environments. It highlights in the need to ensure that applications running between private and public clouds perform up to par.

Companies undertaking digital transformations are leaning heavily on hybrid clouds to deploy software, a scenario playing out across nearly every industry. To enable this at a high velocity, companies are instituting DevOps, in which code is constantly written, shipped, run and regularly refined. In DevOps environments, corporate developers code application functionality, called microservices, which they ship via virtual containers to run between private cloud environments and public cloud systems such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

On-premises HR users risk being left behind, Oracle says

Oracle is telling customers that the future of its HR platform will be in the cloud. It’s trying to do this without alarming users who host its applications internally.

Users of on-premises PeopleSoft and E-Business Suite HR system users won’t be abandoned as cloud use grows, Oracle promises. These systems will get regular updates and new features. There’s no end-of-life risk, said Mark Hurd, Oracle’s CEO. “No worries about that,” he said.

Even with that, however, Oracle’s cloud-basedHuman Capital Management (HCM) system will see many more new features and will pull ahead in capability over on-premises systems, said Hurd.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Larry Ellison says Amazon is ’20 years behind’ Oracle

Larry Ellison continued his assault on Amazon during his second keynote address at Oracle OpenWorld on Tuesday.

“Amazon Web Services are simply not optimized for the Oracle Database. I’ll go further than that: Amazon Web Services aren’t optimized for their own databases either, as you will see,” he said, while displaying a set of benchmarks that showed Oracle Database performing several times faster on Oracle’s cloud than it does on Amazon’s cloud. “It doesn’t get better, it gets worse.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Larry Ellison says Amazon is ’20 years behind’ Oracle

Larry Ellison continued his assault on Amazon during his second keynote address at Oracle OpenWorld on Tuesday.

“Amazon Web Services are simply not optimized for the Oracle Database. I’ll go further than that: Amazon Web Services aren’t optimized for their own databases either, as you will see,” he said, while showing off a set of benchmarks that showed Oracle Database performing several times faster on Oracle’s cloud than it does on Amazon’s cloud. “It doesn’t get better, it gets worse.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

The method behind Google’s machine learning madness

First there was TensorFlow, Google’s machine learning framework. Then there was SyntaxNet, a neural network framework Google released to help developers build applications that understand human language. What comes next is anyone’s guess, but one thing is clear: Google is aggressively open-sourcing the smarts behind some of its most promising AI technology.

Despite giving it away for free, however, Google is also apparently betting that “artificial intelligence will be its secret sauce,” as Larry Dignan details. That “sauce” permeates a bevy of newly announced Google products like Google Home, but it’s anything but secret.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IBM brings Bluemix behind the firewall for sensitive workloads

IBM’s Bluemix development platform is already available in public and hosted private cloud versions. On Thursday, the company announced a third option for customers that need to build apps behind a firewall.

Called Bluemix Local, it adds new hybrid cloud app-development capabilities, giving enterprises the ability to build apps securely and deploy them easily across public, private and on-premise environments.

“It allows you to build a true hybrid app,” said Damion Heredia, IBM’s vice president for Cloud Platform Services. “You can choose where you want different parts to run.”

Bluemix is an implementation of IBM’s Open Cloud Architecture that leverages Cloud Foundry to enable developers to rapidly build, deploy and manage cloud applications while tapping an ecosystem of services and runtime frameworks. It was originally launched as a public cloud offering, but a single-tenant “dedicated” version was launched late last year.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Look forward to cross-dressing FFVII's Cloud and reason behind remake

Look forward to cross-dressing FFVII's Cloud and reason behind remake
While the game, by nature of its storyline and concept, is dark and carries a rather serious atmosphere, the light-hearted aspects, such as Cloud's cross-dressing, will remain one of the features fans can still look forward to. This time in HD quality …
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Cisco, HP Duking It Out For Cloud Infrastructure Crown
Cisco Systems and Hewlett-Packard are neck and neck in the rapidly growing cloud infrastructure equipment market, with both companies owning just over 13 percent of the worldwide market share by revenue, according to new data from Synergy Research …
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Do Teachers or Schools Own Resources Created in the Cloud?
This past December, after nine years of teaching Sophomore English at the same high school, I took a new job. I loved my school, the people I worked with, and the students I taught, so leaving was one of the hardest decisions I've ever had to make …
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Western Digital My Cloud DL4100 (24TB)
If all you need is centralized file storage, then the 24-terabyte Western Digital My Cloud DL4100 ($ 1,529.99) is what you want. This business-oriented network-attached storage (NAS) drive array connects to your wireless router for instant file service …
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