IDG Contributor Network: VDI deserves another look based on Dell EMC VDI Complete

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) is well known to be a vastly underutilized technology in enterprise. A large majority of the market has long been aware of the potential benefits but has been waiting on the technology to mature. The new Dell EMC VDI Complete offering announced recently at Dell EMC World 2017 was a big reminder of how far this technology has most recently progressed and why it is time for a revisit.

Dell EMC’s VDI Complete offering takes a unique step beyond past VDI solution bundles by combining all of the hardware infrastructure and the software stack into a fully validated offering that is priced, delivered, and supported by a single vendor. This consolidated offer structure also enables them to offer a monthly cost per user consumption model in addition to an upfront prepay model. With this introduction, they have tackled each of the top remaining complexities to delivering VDI solutions, namely cost predictability, deployment, and support.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has another killer quarter

To most people, Jeff Bezos’ Amazon is known as the company reshaping the way people buy everything from books to shoes to groceries. But the part of Amazon that is driving Bezos within shouting distance of becoming the world’s richest person doesn’t really sell anything, it rents computing power in the cloud.

The cloud is more profitable than e-tailing

As the New York Times put it on Thursday, “The profit Amazon can make on cloud-computing services is significantly bigger than in its retail sales, and that has helped turn the Seattle company from a consistent money-loser to a respectable moneymaker.”

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Network World Cloud

Cloud computing has another killer quarter

To most people, Jeff Bezos’ Amazon is known as the company reshaping the way people buy everything from books to shoes to groceries. But the part of Amazon that is driving Bezos within shouting distance of becoming the world’s richest person doesn’t really sell anything, it rents computing power in the cloud.

The cloud is more profitable than e-tailing

As the New York Times put it on Thursday, “The profit Amazon can make on cloud-computing services is significantly bigger than in its retail sales, and that has helped turn the Seattle company from a consistent money-loser to a respectable moneymaker.”

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Network World Cloud

Juniper finds its head in the clouds; security is another story

In announcing its Q1 earnings yesterday Juniper company executives were delighted about the company’s returns on its cloud computing directions.

In the results conference call Juniper CEO Rami Rahim said cloud computing sales grew 25% year-over-year and noted that four of the company’s top 10 accounts were cloud-related. Specifically, the cloud vertical earned $ 331.6 million in the first quarter, over $ 264.8 million a year ago.

“As the industry evolves, cloud architectures are no longer the exclusive domain of the cloud providers. Customers across all verticals are developing strategies for moving to cloud service delivery models and this aligns with our strategy to power the cloud transformation,” Rahim said [Seeking Alpha has a full transcript of the call here]. “The cloud is a massive paradigm shift that is reshaping all industries, and I’m excited about the opportunity we have in front of us.”

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: What’s with application monitoring? Another company picks up a monster funding round

An interesting thing is going on in the application and infrastructure monitoring space. A ton of money is being poured into the various vendors in the market, and all of those vendors are rapidly morphing their platforms to provide holistic monitoring functionality. No longer is it just about application monitoring or infrastructure monitoring in isolation. What is de rigueur today is combined monitoring that provides the often-talked about “single pane of glass” across all of an organizations assets.

+ Also on Network World: Infrastructure monitoring products: Users pinpoint the best and worst features +

It’s a fairly busy space—New Relic, DataDog, AppDynamics and a host of others compete. And to that list we must add Wavefront, a Silicon Valley company that recently scored an impressive $ 52 million by way of a Series B funding round. The company advises that their valuation increased four times compared to their Series A round—no down valuations for this player. It also scored top-shelf investors, existing investors Sequoia Capital and Sutter Hill Ventures were joined by new investor Tenaya Capital and other equity holders.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Oracle pays $532 million to snatch up another cloud service provider

Hard on the heels of a similar purchase last week, Oracle has announced it will pay $ 532 million to buy Opower, a provider of cloud services to the utilities industry.

Once a die-hard cloud holdout, Oracle has been making up for lost time by buying a foothold in specific industries through acquisitions such as this one. Last week’s Textura buy gave it a leg up in engineering and construction.

“It’s a good move on Oracle’s part, and it definitely strengthens Oracle’s cloud story,” said Frank Scavo, president of Computer Economics.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Hive — another attempt to resolve the email conundrum

Computerworld Cloud Computing