Do you trust your cloud provider? Addressing these questions will help put you at ease

Although vendor-written, this contributed piece does not promote a product or service and has been edited and approved by Network World editors.

Finding a cloud provider you can trust has become a major responsibility.  Cloud providers come in all shapes and sizes—from global organizations delivering a range of services to small shops specializing in a limited number of capabilities. To normalize the differences you need to ask consistent questions about key issues.

Security should be at or near the very top of your list, with their answers providing the transparency which will help build trust.  An essential first step is to avoid making assumptions on what security is and isn’t with respect to a provider. Every provider is different, with different rules, service-level agreements (SLAs), and terms and conditions. Make sure you thoroughly understand what each service provider commits to you, the customer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Doing eDiscovery, Litigation Hold, and Addressing Journaling in Office 365

Retaining and “journaling” content has been a key requirement of organizations for years, however as organizations have migrated to Office 365, plus with Microsoft’s shift to new and improved eDiscovery tools, the process of “holding” and “searching” for content has changed.

This article covers a whole new series of best practices that EVERY legal department, compliance officer, and content / Office 365 administrator needs to read, understand, and ensure they have Office 365 setup properly so that when the time comes and they need to do eDiscovery of content, that the information they are looking for has actually been held and managed for future look-up.

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Network World Cloud Computing