Hidden cloud migration gotchas — and how to avoid them

Building a technology stack from scratch in the cloud can be a dream — if you’re a startup. But if you’re an established company steeped in on-premises solutions, shifting to the cloud can mean unexpected hurdles and headaches beyond belief.

Companies looking to make good on the benefits of moving to the cloud need to go in with eyes wide open. To be sure, the much discussed benefits of the cloud — in terms of time to market, cost savings, the ability to scale resources as needed, and so on — are real. But enterprise cloud adopters say they have been surprised by some of the lesser-documented challenges migrating to the cloud brings, such as the difficulty in changing traditional mindsets, the lack of visibility into the new infrastructure, the cost of data transfers, governance issues and how licensing agreements need to be revised or new ones negotiated.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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RIP, Systems Administrator, Welcome DevOps

While the traditional sys admin role may fade away, those who are willing to change can take an exciting journey with cloud and DevOps.
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IDG Contributor Network: The future is not the cloud or the fog: it is actually the SEA!

A casual reflection on the last few years in the evolution of the wireless network provides us all the insights necessary to reason that there is at least one final frontier coming down the road. Who can deny that the last few years have been owned by the cloud, virtualization and softwarization (if that is even a word!). Edge Computing too, which is really nothing more than the pushing of all of these concepts deep into places in the network where they have never been before. Fog computing is another term (created by Cisco) for something similar but driven in its genesis more bottom up from the many Internet of Things use cases. The bigger trend is obvious; network intelligence is distributing but where will it, can it go, beyond this?

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Network World Cloud Computing

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Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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‘Pick that cloud, lose our business’: What to do

Here’s a shocker: Wal-Mart is telling some technology companies that if they want Wal-Mart’s business, they can’t use Amazon Web Services. (Wal-Mart says it simply doesn’t want customers storing Wal-Mart’s sensitive info on AWS.) That’s a tall order for technology companies that may have invested millions in their tech running on AWS.

However, if you see it from Wal-Mart’s point of view, Amazon.com’s retail business is costing it billions a year in lost sales, so why not fight back by reducing Amazon’s AWS income from not just Wal-Mart but Wal-Mart’s customers? After all, Amazon.com refuses to sell products from Apple and Google that compete with its own streaming devices and services. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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Is Chrome OS right for you? A 3-question quiz to find out

Google’s Chrome OS is one of the world’s most misunderstood computing platforms. Chromebooks are foundationally different from traditional PCs, after all — and consequently, there are a lot of misconceptions about how they work and what they can and cannot do.

Since people are always asking me whether a Chromebook might be right for their needs, I thought I’d put together a quick guide to help any such wonderers figure it out. Whether it’s you or someone you know who’s curious, the following three questions should help shed some light on what the platform’s all about and for whom it makes sense.

1. Do you spend most of your time using the web and web-centric services?

Think carefully here, as the answer might surprise you: What do you do most often on a computer?

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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Want to Succeed at Data-Driven Transformation? Start Slow

Some organizations race into data-driven transformation. Others want to get everything “right” first. There’s an optimal balance between moving too fast and moving too slow, but few companies get it right. Boston Consulting Group (BCG) suggests some best practices to avoid common pitfalls.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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IDG Contributor Network: What does ‘open’ mean to IT in the cloud era?

The term “open” when used in the IT context is an old and heavily used word. In an industry where new terms are introduced with incredible frequency, then age, and are discarded like napkins at a BBQ restaurant, the term “open” has surprising longevity. But what does “open” mean in the IT context? And why is it important to IT decision makers?

Dictionary.com offers a robust set of definitions for “open” as a verb, adjective and noun. For IT, I like number 5 under adjective – “relatively free of obstructions to sight, movement, or internal arrangement.” This fits with the most common uses in IT associated with open standards and open source software (OSS) – visibility and access to the creation, enhancement and maintenance of standards and software.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: What does ‘open’ mean to IT in the cloud era?

The term “open” when used in the IT context is an old and heavily used word. In an industry where new terms are introduced with incredible frequency, then age, and are discarded like napkins at a BBQ restaurant, the term “open” has surprising longevity. But what does “open” mean in the IT context? And why is it important to IT decision makers?

Dictionary.com offers a robust set of definitions for “open” as a verb, adjective and noun. For IT, I like number 5 under adjective – “relatively free of obstructions to sight, movement, or internal arrangement.” This fits with the most common uses in IT associated with open standards and open source software (OSS) – visibility and access to the creation, enhancement and maintenance of standards and software.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

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Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

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Digital Infrastructure for Cities Leads to Big Savings

A Cisco report claims $ 2.3 trillion is waiting to be realized through digitized services, city management; cites Houston, Oslo, Barcelona as examples.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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IDG Contributor Network: Accelerating Organizational Velocity through a Data Center Autopilot

Understanding the impact of the data center autopilot

Current state of the art and my disappointment with traditional databases aside, I mentioned in my comments last week that the data center autopilot will have big consequences. It seems to me that there is not enough recognition of the likely impact. The tactical observations are that automation will reduce people costs, at least on a per-workload basis, and that automation will:

  • Minimize over-provisioning,
  • Help reduce downtime,
  • Help to manage SLAs, and
  • Improve transparency, governance, auditing and accounting.

That is all true, but it’s not the big story: The overall strategic impact is to significantly accelerate organizational velocity. The acceleration is partly as a result of the above efficiencies, but much more importantly as a consequence of automated decisions being made and implemented orders-of-magnitude faster than manual decisions can be. Aviation autopilots do things that human pilots are not fast enough to do. They are used to stabilize deliberately unstable aircraft such as the Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk at millisecond timescales, and deliver shorter flight times by constantly monitoring hundreds of sensors in real time and optimally exploiting jetstreams.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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Blockchain Barges into Insurance via IBM, AIG

IBM helps AIG create a cross-country, multi-party international risk policy tailored to use blockchain’s security and trust.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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The 2 cloud security myths that must die

There seem to be two groups of people out there when it comes to cloud security: There are those who believe that public clouds are systemically unsafe, and those who believe clouds are impenetrable.

They’re both wrong. Both of these myths are dangerous, and so they need to die.

Kill this myth: If my data is in a public cloud, it’s inherently unsafe

The thinking goes like this: Because I can’t see it or touch it, others can steal it.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: Digital Ecosystems: Do Not Do It Alone!

As software becomes an increasingly large part of an enterprise’s external expression, traditional physical ecosystems—such as suppliers, resellers, and retailers—need to be supplemented, and in some cases supplanted, by new software ecosystems.

Consider Walgreens, a customer of my employer, Google. To interact with customers, Walgreens doesn’t merely operate physical stores and provide first-party apps and websites. On the contrary, it also expresses core services—such as filling prescriptions or ordering photo prints—as APIs. This enables developers and partners to easily integrate Walgreens services into their own products, which in turn enables Walgreens to extend its brand presence into ecosystems it neither owns nor had to build.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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3 killer cloud skills that will get you hired today

One of the most common questions that I’m asked is: “What cloud skills do I need that will get me hired quickly?”

First, keep in mind that this is an emerging area, so what employers are looking for is constantly shifting. Second, even if they do hire you for a specific skill, you’ll be asked to retrain and retool as the cloud technology matures.

Still, here are three skills that should get you hired right now:

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A 4-Step Methodology for Finding the Right Cloud Provider

Don’t rush into the cloud before taking the time to understand what you want, and what you need.
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Forget the GUI: The return of the command line

If you immerse yourself in Microsoft history for long enough, you’ll come across more than one story about staff trying to add more command-line features to its operating systems. The plans go up the corporate tree, to the rarified heights of a Bill Gates review, where the executives ask, “What part of the name Windows do you have a problem with?”

Corporate legends aside, Windows on both the desktop and server have long been the province of GUIs, point-and-click experiences driving everything from files on desktop PCs to managing entire virtual networks in the public cloud. That was all very well when you were dealing with tens of PCs and a handful of servers in an office. It even still worked for client-server enterprise applications or a small farm of web servers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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IDG Contributor Network: Cloud API integration platforms make the digital economy work

In the digital economy, integration and collaboration involving platforms and applications is essential for success. Whether with a startup or a mature enterprise, one of the most important strategic initiatives a business puts forth is the design and implementation of a clean and efficient SaaS-based application programming interface (API) integration system.

“APIs are important because no man is an island,” says Matthew Woodget, CEO of Go Narrative, a Seattle-based marketing consultancy specializing in storytelling for business. “We are interconnected and our technology needs to be too.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

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How ConocoPhillips Reduced its Data Center Footprint by 80%

Scott Duplantis, Global IT Director for server, storage, and data center operations at ConocoPhillips, explains his company’s data center consolidation project at the InformationWeek News Desk at Interop ITX.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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IDG Contributor Network: When it comes to cloud, one size does not fit all

While the cloud market is very competitive, enterprises are making it clear that when it comes to cloud, one size does not fit all. They can’t build their businesses by just relying on infrastructure-as-a-serve (IaaS) and committing to one vendor.

These sentiments were echoed by Mary Meeker’s annual internet trends report, which found that companies are increasingly concerned about being locked-in with one cloud vendor. Citing data from Bain and Morgan Stanley, it was found that in 2015, 22 percent of organizations surveyed said they had concerns about using only one cloud vendor, compared with only seven percent in 2012.

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