G Suite vs. Office 365 cloud collaboration battle heats up

CIOs and IT managers are increasingly adopting Microsoft’s Office 365 and Google’s G Suite for collaboration, productivity and messaging. These cloud-based productivity suites are expanding, gaining new feature sets and new apps for enterprise users. Earlier this month, both Google and Microsoft introduced chat-based collaboration apps to reposition for competition in this fast evolving and hotly contested space.

Microsoft’s Teams, which has been in beta since November, was released for general availability for Office 365 customers. And Google introduced a rebuilt Hangouts, which has been split into two apps — Hangouts Chat for chat-based communications and Hangouts Meet for audio and video conferencing.

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Network World Cloud Computing

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Inscrutable Amazon Bill: Behind It, a $1 Million Savings

When Segment found its AWS bill going up unexpectedly, it did a deep dive to find the cause and realized a $ 1 million annual savings.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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IDG Contributor Network: ZeroStack and Nimble get close to offering a converged infrastructure solution

Maybe I haven’t attended many legacy vendors’ conferences lately, but I haven’t seemed to have heard many converged infrastructure mentions recently.

Go back a year or two and every legacy vendor under the sun (and every younger vendor wanting to partner or be acquired by a legacy vendor) was dropping the converged infrastructure moniker all the time. Converged infrastructure (CI from now on) is a pretty simple concept, one which users of personal computing devices will see as normal. Essentially CI is all about offering storage, compute and the infrastructure to run it all within one unit. Instead of having a standalone storage device, some compute infrastructure elsewhere, and some software to tie it all together, CI packs it all up nicely with a bow on it.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: The revolution will not be televised – it’ll be computerized

Imagine that you have millions of supporters eager to help your cause. You only have a few weeks to get organized and hardly any existing systems or budget. How do you harness all the volunteer energy?

This was the challenge that the Bernie Sander’s presidential campaign faced. The system developed would be used to make seventy-five million calls, launch eight million text messages, and hold more than one-hundred thousand public meetings.

How did they do it? What software was used? What lessons were learnt?

Background

Political campaigns are a stress test of organizing skills. Only candidates who do well in the initial caucuses and primaries proceed in the campaign. It’s essential to organize, raise funds and expand quickly. Systems and infrastructure have to be built with limited time, budgets and manpower.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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No Cloud is Perfect, So Be Prepared

Enterprise IT managers have to accept that cloud outages will occur, and have strategies to keep core systems running.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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The barrier to cloud security isn’t the technology

You want solid cloud security, so you work to find the best approach and technology. But that won’t get the job done.

The truth is that competent cloud security technology is available, and most IT organizations’ cloud teams are good at finding and using it. But cloud IT doesn’t exist in a vacuum, so having the right approach and technology alone won’t secure your cloud operations.

To achieve solid cloud security, departments across IT need to come together, both those that focus on legacy and those that focus on cloud computing.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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Look before you leap: 4 hard truths about IoT

Most technologies go through a stage when everything seems possible. Personal computers in the early 1980s, the internet in the late 1990s and mobile apps around the beginning of this decade were like that.

But so was the first unboxing of a Galaxy Note 7. In time, either suddenly or gradually, reality sets in.

The internet of things still looks promising, with vendors and analysts forecasting billions of connected devices that will solve all sorts of problems in homes and enterprises. But the seams are starting to show on this one, too. As promising as the technology is, it has some shortcomings. Here are a few.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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Microsoft expands connected car push with patent licensing

Microsoft’s push into the connected car space has moved up a gear with a new patent licensing agreement with Toyota. The world’s second-largest auto maker will have access to a range of Microsoft patents as part of the deal announced this week.

Rather than trying to build a high-tech automobile of its own, Microsoft is focusing on providing carmakers with the tools they need to create smarter vehicles and the Toyota deal is the first of what it hopes will be a series of such agreements.

Microsoft offers an entire suite of cloud services aimed at aiding the development of internet-enabled automobiles and is also integrating its Cortana virtual assistant into cars alongside PCs, phones and other devices. In the future, a connected car could become a rolling extension of a user’s office, with Office 365 integrations.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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Look before you leap: 4 hard truths about IoT

Most technologies go through a stage when everything seems possible. Personal computers in the early 1980s, the internet in the late 1990s and mobile apps around the beginning of this decade were like that.

But so was the first unboxing of a Galaxy Note 7. In time, either suddenly or gradually, reality sets in.

The internet of things still looks promising, with vendors and analysts forecasting billions of connected devices that will solve all sorts of problems in homes and enterprises. But the seams are starting to show on this one, too. As promising as the technology is, it has some shortcomings. Here are a few.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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Review: SaltStack shifts devops into high gear

The only sane and efficient way to manage a large numbers of servers—or even a few dozen, if they change often—is through automation. Automation tools have to be learned and mastered, so they exact a significant up-front cost, but they dramatically reduce the administrative burden in the long run. Perhaps most important, they provide a staunch line of defense against the fatal fat-fingered mistake, which even the most sophisticated cloud operators struggle to avoid.

Ease of use. Configuration management is simple with SaltStack. Because Salt uses the YAML configuration format, states are can be written quickly and easily. YAML state descriptions are structured well, with solid readability. The support for Mako, JSON, Wempy, and Jinja allows developers to extend Salt’s capabilities. The availability of built-in modules makes it easy to configure and manage states.

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(Insider Story)
InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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