IDG Contributor Network: PureSec picks up investment because serverless is exciting

While in Israel late last year, I caught up with Shaked Zin and Avi Shulman, co-founders of security company PureSec. PureSec was in a bit of a conundrum. It was doing important work but in a space that was still nascent: serverless computing. As such, it was having a hard time both articulating its value proposition and getting investors to understand and commit to their story.

I found this conundrum interesting. Serverless computing is, after all, pretty high on the hype cycle. Ever since Amazon Web Services (AWS) introduced the notion of serverless via its Lambda offering a few years ago, all vendors have been rushing to commercialize their own serverless offering.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: The high cost and risk of On-Premise vs. Cloud

When was the last time I bought an on-prem application?  Over five years ago and I am not looking back. Having been a CIO for many years, I have seen my share of large-scale software implementations and the maintenance and upgrade overhead that comes with on-prem applications. The numbers are varied, but it’s safe to assume that 30-40% of companies have moved into the Cloud and use it as a resource for their applications and/or infrastructure.

Should you simply jump into the pool with the others?  Of course not. First off, a simple “lift and shift” of applications from on-prem into the Cloud will produce minimal benefit if any, and those may be consumed by the resources required for the move itself. That said, a careful strategy to re-engineer your applications platform into the Cloud could have significant cost savings and operational efficiencies. A very detailed TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) is required before making such a strategic decision. There are a variety of published methods for calculating TCO.  My advice is to make friends with the team in Finance and together agree on which method is best for your environment.  Then partner with Finance to do the TCO.  If it has Finance’s fingerprint on it, the credibility ranking goes real high.  

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Twilio jumps on the serverless bandwagon

News from the second day of Twilio’s annual developer conference, Signal. While yesterday’s big news focused around end-user functionality (in particular speech recognition and understanding), today’s news is more down in the weeds but no less important for a company at the cutting edge of the developer experience.

You see developers are, by nature, tinkerers and like to experiment with new stuff. Sometimes this is simply professional interest, but often it’s because of an almost pathological desire to do things effectively, efficiently and elegantly. A case in point is the current developer move towards serverless technologies. First commercialized by Amazon Web Services (AWS) with its Lambda product, but now matched by offerings from the other cloud vendors, serverless approaches mean that developers don’t need to set up servers to run their applications, they can simply rely on setting triggers, logical steps and the cloud vendor takes over the rest.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: SAP sets a course for the future

At its massive customer conference held last week in Orlando, SAP made it clear that it was charting a new course for the future. In announcing Leonardo — what it calls a digital innovation system — and in interviews with company executives, the message was unambiguous: SAP is an important part of the enterprise digital transformation story.

While the messaging around Leonardo was a bit muddled and at times felt like a bucket of buzzwords, it represents a decisive step forward in its effort to transform the company from a legacy, back-office technology player into the enterprise’s digital transformation platform and enabler of choice. According to its press release, the goal of Leonardo is to, “enable customers to rapidly innovate and scale that innovation to redefine their business for the digital world.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

LinkedIn Leads Standardized Cloud Gear Alliance

A group of major backers has formed the Project19 Foundation to support standardized gear and networking across cloud data centers.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Twilio does speech recognition and understanding, the right way

We’ve all had horrendous experiences with voice recognition when calling a support center – I’d like to think that it’s just me with my slightly unusual Kiwi accent, but everyone I talk to has similar stories of getting exasperated at an automated call center that hopelessly gets even the most basic speech recognition exercises wrong. It’s a sad reality of the modern world that organizations try to shoehorn users into solutions that aren’t yet fit for purpose, just to save some costs.

The world of communications has been the focus of Jeff Lawson for the past few years. Lawson is founder and CEO of Twilio, the company that offers a modular communications platform that developers use to power the communication functions of their apps. From tiny startups to huge companies like Uber rely on Twilio to manage all the communication stuff, so that they don’t have to. in a phone conversation prior to Twilio’s annual developer conference, Signal, Lawson told me that ever since the beginnings of Twilio, back when all they did was voice communications, he has hated voice recognition.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Data: Lifeblood of the Internet of Things

As computing power becomes increasingly distributed into the devices and infrastructure around us, the data generated by those devices will invariably play a larger role in our businesses and everyday lives.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Microsoft’s P language is aimed at where cloud, AI, and IoT meet

Microsoft is positioning its P language as a solution for asynchrony in a world where this capability is becoming increasingly vital for the cloud, artificial intelligence, and embedded systems.

Geared to asynchronous event-driven programming, the open source P unifies modeling and programming into a single activity. “Today’s software uses cloud resources, is often embedded in devices in the physical world and employs artificial intelligence techniques,” said Shaz Qadeer, a principal researcher at Microsoft. Such applications feature asynchrony, leading to issues with race conditions and “heisenbugs” (named after the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle), which are timing-related bugs that often disappear during an investigation of it. P was was built to address the challenges.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: An under-pressure OpenStack gets support from an (in)famous individual

Last week saw a few thousand devoted OpenStack community members flock to Boston to take part in the bi-annual OpenStack Summit. This summit marks a major turning point for the initiative. Since we all congregated in Barcelona last year, there have been some major pieces of news which have rocked the community. Only a couple of weeks before the event, Intel pulled out of a partnership with Rackspace to build an OpenStack-based test facility, and OpenStack poster boy Mirantis pivoted from a pure OpenStack strategy to one covering a number of open source initiatives.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Google’s machine-learning cloud pipeline explained

When Google first told the world about its Tensor Processing Unit, the strategy behind it seemed clear enough: Speed machine learning at scale by throwing custom hardware at the problem. Use commodity GPUs to train machine-learning models; use custom TPUs to deploy those trained models.

The new generation of Google’s TPUs is designed to handle both of those duties, training and deploying, on the same chip. That new generation is also faster, both on its own and when scaled out with others in what’s called a “TPU pod.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Google’s new TPUs are here to accelerate AI training

Google has made another leap forward in the realm of machine learning hardware. The tech giant has begun deploying the second version of its Tensor Processing Unit, a specialized chip meant to accelerate machine learning applications, company CEO Sundar Pichai announced on Wednesday.

The new Cloud TPU sports several improvements over its predecessor. Most notably, it supports training machine learning algorithms in addition to processing the results from existing models. Each chip can provide 180 teraflops of processing for those tasks. Google is also able to network the chips together in sets of what are called TPU Pods that allow even greater computational gains.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: When does tech make you money and when does it cost you?

There’s an interesting Forbes article on the topic of turning a cost center into a profit center. In it, author Larry Myler talks about three ways to “become a hero” by:

  1. Killing overhead,
  2. Inventing revenue, and
  3. Supporting company strategy.

Having worked in cost centers within organizations myself, I was skeptical as to whether this can actually be done. If so, it would change the game for just about any company trying to reduce costs and increase revenues (and that would be almost every organization).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

MTM’s Kleyman: Build Your Business on a Secure IoT

CTO of MTM Technologies Bill Kleyman says your future customers will reach you over the Internet of Things.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Going interstellar with Microsoft Cosmos

At Microsoft’s Build developer conference last week, the company announced Cosmos DB, a new cloud database offering that, if you believe the hype, entirely changed the database game. Before reelecting on what this means for developers and organizations, it’s worth taking a look at what Cosmos is.

Cosmos is a schema-free database service built with the aim of delivering high performance, fault tolerance, automatic indexing of data and truly globally distributed scalability. Cosmos is, at least in part, the evolution of Microsoft’s previous DocumentDB offering. DocumentDB was Redmond’s first foray into the NoSQL world. And while DocumentDB was a NoSQL choice in contrast to Microsoft’s relation offerings, Cosmos DB is multi-modal, offering developers the options to store relational or non-relational data. Scott Guthrie, Microsoft’s perennially red-shirted Executive Vice President of the Cloud and Enterprise group, described Cosmos as, “the first globally distributed, multi-model database service delivering turnkey global horizontal scale out with guaranteed uptime and millisecond latency at the 99th percentile.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: RackWare, like everyone, wants to manage hybrid clouds everywhere

RackWare offers a management and automation platform that enterprises use to manage their computing resources to more closely follow demand. RackWare’s core proposition is that its management suite delivers cost savings to customers of a suggested 40 to 50 percent. Additionally, RackWare promises to deliver the highest levels of performance and availability to their customers.

The company today released a new take on its management suite that aims to extend the existing core RackWare offering. The new platform promises to offer enterprises a single solution (they refrained from calling it a single pane of glass) to move applications, protect those same applications and manage all the different applications across the totality of their infrastructure. Justifying the move, RackWare points to a recent IDC report that suggests 70 percent of heavy cloud users are considering a hybrid cloud strategy.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: How to avoid downtime and disruption when moving data

Business Continuity Awareness Week 2017 is here, and hopefully it will present a fresh opportunity to review some of the cloud’s limitations in this area.

Some 60 percent of all enterprise IT workloads will be run in some form of public or private cloud by as soon as next year, according to 451 Research’s latest estimate. It projects particularly strong growth in critical categories, including data analytics and core business applications. Findings from IDC, Gartner and Forrester present broadly the same picture—that the cloud is rapidly becoming central rather than peripheral to general IT provision.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

The cloud can’t fix poor application performance

Have you heard the fairy tale that application performance on the cloud is automatically optimized, without any effort from developers or administrators?

Too many people believe it’s reality, and not a fairy tale.

I blame the confusion on early cloud hype, when “elasticity” was often stated as something related to cloud performance. Although elasticity does let you scale on demand by provisioning servers, or perhaps automatically these days using serverless computing technology, the elasticity concept unto itself does not guarantee well-performing applications.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Azure Stack and the role of context

There were dozens of announcements at Microsoft’s Build conference last week, but perhaps one caused the most angst among the cloud cognoscenti.

I’m referring to the upcoming general availability of Azure Stack. Microsoft’s offering will let organizations leverage the Azure cloud operating system, but only within the context of an on-premises deployment.

Azure Stack has something of a checkered past — it has been announced, in one guise or another, more than once. I remember years ago the notion of a private cloud deployment that would involve Microsoft software and partner hardware. That never really eventuated, and things went quiet.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Windows 10 Fall Creators Update Preview

Microsoft has announced its Windows 10 Fall Creators Preview, with new features like Timeline, Pick Up Where You Left Off, and the new Story Remix. Here’s what the new update will include.
Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

VeloCloud launches an SD-WAN security ecosystem

This column is available in a weekly newsletter called IT Best Practices.  Click here to subscribe.  

It’s a great time to be in the SD-WAN business. IDC estimates that worldwide SD-WAN revenues will exceed $ 6 billion in 2020, with a compound annual growth rate of more than 90% over the 2015-to-2020 forecast period. According to IHS, as of the end of 2016, 13% of North American enterprises already have the technology in production and 62% are in lab trials. By 2018, 82% are expected to be using SD-WAN.

Those are some pretty remarkable adoption rates for a technology that is still in its early days.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Xero breaks through its glass ceiling: customers, revenue and cashflow

It’s fair to say that no one has been covering Xero longer than I have. I first talked to its co-founder and CEO, Rod Drury, long before the company launched a product. Trawling back through my emails and I discovered that we first talked about his vision 10 years ago to the day. (Rod, we really should have a celebratory beer!) I can’t imagine he’ll be celebrating the milestone, but it does go to show just how long Drury has been on this journey.

When it was founded, Xero took a very unusual path, listing on the New Zealand Stock Exchange before it even had a real product and customers. Backed by some high-profile names, and with Drury’s masterful marketing execution, Xero got its IPO away in the nick of time, just before the GFC really took its hold.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IT Outages, Who’s Really at Fault?

Systems do go down, and sometimes the cause seems obvious, but it may be too obvious. Employ root cause analysis methods to find the real cause of failure.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Gartner Chart Puts Salesforce at Top of Low-Code Platforms

A new Magic Quadrant looks at platforms for the high-productivity building of applications, including mobile apps; Salesforce scores.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Cloud is How You Design Your Software, Not Where You Run it

At Interop May 18, Cornelia Davis will describe the elements of cloud-native software, the type that’s designed to be change-tolerant.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Microsoft’s new tools help devs manage cloud deployments on the go

Microsoft is making it easier for developers to manage their cloud deployments on the go, using a new mobile app and browser-based command line.

On Wednesday, the company unveiled Azure Cloud Shell, which lets developers spin up a full-fledged terminal environment inside Microsoft’s cloud and comes with a set of preconfigured tools for managing deployments. Each user will have persistent file storage in their Cloud Shell, hosted in Microsoft Azure.

Cloud Shells are accessible through the Microsoft Azure web portal, as well as the Azure mobile app for iOS and Android, which was just released Wednesday. That app also provides users with the ability to monitor the workloads they have running in Microsoft’s public cloud and perform basic management like stopping and restarting virtual machines.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Stratasys unveils an assembly line of cloud-controlled robotic 3D printers

Stratasys is developing a cloud-service platform that comprises expandable, server rack-like modular 3D printer units configured under one software platform to work simultaneously to mass produce parts.

The assembly line-style 3D printing platform will reside both in Stratasys’ own facilities as well as on the premises of business partners who can use the new Continuous Build 3D Demonstrator system to build their own parts or allow customers to use it for their own manufacturing needs.

Stratasys 3D Continuous Build Demonstrator Stratasys

Each 3D “print cell” (an individual 3D printer) in the array can produce a different print job to enable mass customization in volume production environments. Additional print cells can be added at any time to the scalable platform, and there is no theoretical limit to the number of cells, according to Tim Bohling, chief marketing officer at Stratasys.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Email, email, in the cloud

As my company continues to move enterprise applications to the cloud, the latest development presents a security opportunity. We are giving up our on-premises Microsoft Exchange email in favor of the Microsoft Office 365 service. With the transition, we might be able to curtail the common employee practice of communicating and storing sensitive business-related data in email.

I am encouraging the IT organization to tighten security by implementing controls that were either not available in our on-premises deployment or never implemented. The first order of business is a cleanup of accounts and distribution lists. We have hundreds of email-enabled distribution lists, and too many of them are available to the world. We should be able to cut down the number of lists and set rules about who can use them.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: An API recipe for the disruption of traditional industries

The use of APIs is a good indicator of an enterprise’s ability to adapt to the digital needs of customers. APIs are at the heart of a business’ ability to develop products faster, seamlessly integrate data systems, and extend their reach to new partners and other value co-creators.

Business readiness for digital

You can often tell a business’ API readiness just by looking at their website. If they have an online chat system for customers to reach out, offer email or white paper downloads, have an intuitive, engaging design, and offer some way to contact them via mobile devices, chances are they are at least taking steps towards being digitally ready.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Microsoft announces a Surface laptop that won’t run Call of Duty

Locked-down laptops rule the classroom.

It’s already possible to control what apps can be accessed if you hand a middle schooler a Chromebook. What can you run on that thing? Not anything fun. Industrious hackers could run a first-person shooter through a browser window, but let’s be honest — it’s not going to run the latest Call of Duty game.

Now, Microsoft wants to essentially do the same thing.

The Microsoft Surface laptop — available in four trendy colors like cobalt blue — weighs 2.76 pounds, opens with a finger, and runs the new Windows 10 S operating system, which only supports approved apps you can download from the Windows Store.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts: