Visual Studio’s cloud IDE gets smarter about builds

Microsoft’s Visual Studio Team Services cloud-based application development platform is improving pull requests, package management, and GitHub build integration.

Upgrades will make it easier to work with pull requests assigned to teams, Microsoft said in a bulletin discussing improvements planned for rollout during the next few weeks. “When a PR is created or updated, email alerts will now be sent to all members of all teams that are assigned to the PR,” the company said in release notes on Team Services. A future release will support pull requests assigned to Azure Active Directory groups and teams containing these groups.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Heroku: PaaS is future of development tools

The mantra that all companies need to become software companies is starting to sound familiar. PaaS clouds are the key to making this happen, by providing the means to get customer-facing applications up and running quickly, Heroku CEO Adam Gross argued this week at a developer’s conference.

Gross said that even companies not known for producing software need to be as good at operating customer apps as Amazon, Facebook, or Google. “How are they going to absorb all that complexity and sophistication? It’s not going to be by starting at the bottom of the stack,” he said. Instead, a higher level of abstraction is needed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says

SAP’s named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

“If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background,” warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Amazon’s Alexa gains support for Outlook calendars

Users of Amazon’s Alexa virtual assistant can now ask it questions about the contents of their Microsoft-hosted calendars. On Wednesday, the assistant gained the ability to interact with calendars from Outlook.com and Office 365, similar to how it works with Google Calendar.

Amazon didn’t make an announcement for the new feature. When asked about the change, a company spokesperson said that it was designed to only work with personal calendars.

That said, it was possible for me to connect my Office 365 calendar, which is provided through an enterprise subscription. When asked about what’s on my schedule, Alexa answered with the contents of my work calendar. It’s unclear if Amazon plans to continue supporting that functionality, and it may break at any time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, U.K. court says

SAP’s named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday. The case pitted SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

“If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background,” warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Dell EMC combines hyperconvergence and cloud in latest VxRail offering

Dell EMC is now offering a combination of its VxRail hyperconverged infrastructure and the Dell EMC Enterprise Hybrid Cloud (EHC) platform to make it easier for mid-size organizations to build private clouds.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: This DARPA-backed Machine Learning program is a quick thinker | Hot Products at RSA 2017 +

VxRail, which combines compute, network and virtual storage, is based largely on VMware management software, including the vRealize Suite, which allows for self-provisioning of virtual machines, and vSAN, which is VMware’s virtual storage array. Dell EMC introduced VxRail about a year ago and Thursday said that to date it has sold 8,000 nodes to 1,000 customers, reaching over 65 Petabytes of scale.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Docker’s tops for devops, AWS is the cloud king

Docker is the king of devops tools, hybrid cloud is beating public-only and private-only clouds, and Microsoft Azure is making sizable headway in public cloud.

Those are some of the key insights from this year’s edition of SaaS provider RightScale’s State of the Cloud report, which is derived from a survey of more than 1,000 IT pros around the world.

Docker keeps climbing — and here comes Kubernetes

If there’s one devops tool that’s out in front with cloud-conscious companies, it’s Docker. Thirty-five percent of respondents were already using it, and 32 percent had plans to do so. These numbers outstripped those of Chef, Puppet, Ansible, Salt, Mesosphere, and Rancher.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Private Cloud Merits 2nd Look As Container Environment

Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation, says Project Zun gives enterprise IT a new reason to reconsider OpenStack for private clouds.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Deloitte: These Emerging Technologies Will Play Critical Roles

Deloitte Consulting cites seven emerging technologies as critical to the future of IT: dark analytics, mixed reality and blockchain included.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Splice Machine seeks to deliver hybrid RDBMS as a service

Splice Machine, which specializes in an open source relational database for hybrid workloads, wants to bring that database to the cloud as a service.

The company announced this week that it will release Cloud RDBMS, a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) on Amazon Web Services (AWS) this spring. It noted that Cloud RDBMS will be able to power applications and perform analytics, without the need for ETL and separate analytical databases.

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Microsoft blends IaaS and PaaS with new Managed Disks

Microsoft introduced a nifty new feature to its Azure public cloud this week called Managed Disks. The idea is that developers will not have to worry about provisioning storage when spinning up virtual machines. Managed Disks automatically adds persistent disk storage for Azure virtual machines as applications demand it.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: HPE’s Mesosphere reseller agreement heats up the container management market | Rackspace is cutting 6% of its workforce +

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

N.C. wind farm goes live despite legislators’ claims it’s a national security threat

The first utility-scale wind farm in North Carolina is now fully operational even though the state’s top politicians wanted President Donald Trump to nix the $ 400 million project because they said it’s a national security threat.

Avangrid Renewables today announced the wind farm, sporting 104 turbines that are 50-stories tall, is now generating 670 megawatt hours (MWh), enough electricity for 61,000 homes. The wind farm is located in the northern part of the state and was built out across farm lands.

North Carolina Wind farm Avangrid Renewables

One of 106 wind turbines under construction as part a 670MWh farm that will power Amazon’s Virginia data centers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Microsoft launches new Azure intellectual property protections

Microsoft wants to help its cloud customers feel better protected from intellectual property lawsuit threats. To that end, the company is launching a new feature that’s designed to give them additional shielding.

The Azure IP Advantage program (the IP stands for intellectual property) provides a trio of benefits. First, Microsoft will indemnify all Azure customers from intellectual property infringement claims resulting from their use of Azure products, including open source components.

Second, the company will allow customers that meet a set of criteria access to a “patent pick” program, which will allow them to transfer one Microsoft patent from a list of 10,000 to help them with defending against an infringement suit.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Google Cloud Search helps enterprise users find data quickly

Google is wooing enterprise customers with the forthcoming launch of a service that will let employees find information they need from multiple sources.

Cloud Search is a new service that will allow users to find content from their company email, cloud storage and directory. Directory lookup provides users not only with their colleagues’ contact details, but also information about shared files and calendar events. More than that, Cloud Search is also built to proactively help users access information they need.

When users log into Cloud Search either on the web or on their Android device, they’ll be greeted by “assist cards” that are supposed to highlight key files. At launch, those cards are built to show users files that are relevant for their upcoming calendar events, as well as those that require attention based on recent edits.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: Qwilt moves content delivery to the edge

The other day I was quietly driving along a country road near where I live and happened across an irate looking driver, parked up at the edge of the road. Much of his irate-ness was, I assume, caused by the fact that he was driving a late model, European sports car which had unceremoniously broken down rendering him hot (it’s summer in the Southern Hemisphere), immobile and in possession of a very expensive hunk of steel and alloy.

As I left the scene, with him not wanting outside help, I got thinking about how being broken down on the side of a road with a very expensive vehicle is analogous to having some fantastic content on the internet that, alas, can’t get to those who want to view it. It looks good, but is pretty much useless to everyone.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

RethinkDB finds a new home at the Linux Foundation

RethinkDB may have failed as a business, but it’s getting new life as part of the Linux Foundation. As announced today, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has purchased the RethinkDB intellectual property assets for $ 25,000, which it has relicensed under the developer-friendly Apache License (ASLv2) and gifted the code to the Linux Foundation.

It’s an intriguing development and possibly an out for other failed startups with interesting software assets, although “it’s unlikely that another deal along these lines would emerge” given the “highly unusual set of circumstances,” as CNCF Executive Director Dan Kohn told me.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Snap to pay Google $400M a year for cloud services

Over the next five years, the company behind Snapchat will pay Google at least $ 2 billion in cloud bills.

On Thursday, Snap revealed in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission that it signed a five-year contract to pay Google at least $ 400 million a year for cloud services. That’s a steep figure, considering that Snap made roughly $ 404 million last year. 

In return for the massive commitment, Snap will receive reduced pricing, though it’s not clear how deep the company’s discounts will be. Sinking a bunch of money into Google Cloud makes sense, because Snapchat began its life built on top of Google’s AppEngine platform-as-a-service offering.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: A guide to hybrid cloud transformation

Enterprises have made it clear that when it comes to cloud computing, one size does not fit all.  What we’re hearing from the market is the need for consistency with choice, otherwise known as a balanced cloud platform. Unique business needs, along with security, geography and regulatory considerations, dictate a mixing and matching of both public and private cloud solutions—thus the rise of hybrid.

Case in point, Forrester surveyed 1,000-plus North American and European enterprise decision makers and found that in the next 12 months 38 percent are building private clouds, 32 percent are building public clouds, and 59 percent are adopting a hybrid model.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

IDG Contributor Network: A guide to hybrid cloud transformation

Enterprises have made it clear that when it comes to cloud computing, one size does not fit all.  What we’re hearing from the market is the need for consistency with choice, otherwise known as a balanced cloud platform. Unique business needs, along with security, geography and regulatory considerations, dictate a mixing and matching of both public and private cloud solutions—thus the rise of hybrid.

Case in point, Forrester surveyed 1,000-plus North American and European enterprise decision makers and found that in the next 12 months 38 percent are building private clouds, 32 percent are building public clouds, and 59 percent are adopting a hybrid model.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

4 Trends In 2017 That Every Developer Needs To Understand

Developers need to be ready for the opportunities that quantum computing, big data, and mixed reality might bring to all computing sectors, including commercial computing, in 2017.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Related Posts:

AWS quarterly revenue continues to rise, but growth slows

The rocketship of cloud growth continued at the end of 2016 for Amazon Web Services. The public cloud provider announced Thursday that it brought in a little more than $ 3.5 billion during the fourth quarter of last year, up 47 percent from the same period in 2015. Quarterly operating income rose 60 percent to $ 926 million, compared to $ 580 million during the prior year quarter. 

That’s nothing to sneeze at, but AWS’s revenue growth was the lowest it has been in the past two years. There are a number of potential explanations for that, including seasonal changes in cloud migrations, and increasing difficulties on Amazon didn’t provide an explanation for that, but it likely has to do with AWS’s growing revenue base overall.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Juniper heads to the clouds with Unite

Not to state the obvious, but the cloud has been growing in popularity over the past decade. However, contrary to much of the rhetoric I hear about today, the cloud is not going to kill of private data centers any time soon. The explosion in data has driven growth in both private data centers and public clouds.

Underscoring that point is that almost all the IT leaders I speak to plan to do some kind of hybrid cloud where they leverage the strengths of both.

The cloud is a new compute model, but what’s different about it from other compute paradigms before it is that it is highly network centric. Everyone loves the cloud. It’s great, it’s elastic and a bunch of other things. But it won’t provide the results companies are looking for without the right network underneath it. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Juniper battles Cisco, Huawei with new cloud infrastructure software, switches

Helping customers transform their enterprise environments to the cloud is the driving strategy behind new software, switches and services introduced this week from Juniper Networks.

The networking company is introducing what it calls the third pillar of its Unite architecture – the previous two focusing on enterprise and branch office networking. Unite Cloud combines Juniper’s switches and software to simplify management and growth of corporate cloud computing.

+More on Network World: Has Cisco broken out of the network hardware box?+

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Google upgrades G Suite with tools for IT pros

Google today bolstered its G Suite of productivity apps with new controls and tools for IT professionals. G Suite administrators now have more access to control security key enforcement, data control with data loss prevention (DLP) for Google Drive and Gmail, and additional insights by connecting Gmail to BigQuery, Google’s enterprise data warehouse designed to enable SQL queries, according to Google.

All of the changes, which are live today, are designed to elevate G Suite for the enterprise, especially among companies that need more confidence in the controls they can maintain over corporate data, according to Google.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Dropbox highlights productivity enhancements in rollout of new services

Dropbox kicked off its 2017 product launches with a pair of major announcements Monday aimed at improving users’ productivity at work. The cloud storage company announced the general availability of its Paper document collaboration service, along with the closed beta of a Smart Sync feature that gives users easy access to every file shared with them in Dropbox.

Paper , first announced in 2015 , gives users a shared workspace to work with one another on documents. It’s designed to be the product people use for collaborative tasks like brainstorming and taking meeting notes.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

New products of the week 1.30.17

Network World Cloud Computing

Related Posts:

Trump’s TPP trade move a setback for cloud computing

On the heels of the news that President Trump has removed the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a massive trade deal that he blasted as a candidate, experts warned of the fallout for cloud-computing companies that have been advocating for policies to break down digital trade barriers that restrict the flow of data traffic across international boundaries.

At the annual State of the Net tech policy conference in Washington, the news was met with disappointment by a panel of experts, who said that the provisions of the TPP governing the activities of tech companies would have been an important step toward establishing international norms for trade in the digital age.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Related Posts: