IDG Contributor Network: Cloud isn’t easy, but it needs to be

Over the past decade, I’ve witnessed a constant stream of IT executives and technology professionals view cloud as a threat to their careers. The business side of the organization has always been a captive customer of IT’s services, and now IT feels threatened by the litany of low-cost solutions readily available in the public cloud.  

Every once in a while IT begrudgingly agrees to implement a public cloud solution.  When the do, they carefully fence it off from the rest of IT—nominally to protect the company from hackers, but equally to protect the purity of IT. Treating cloud as a standalone point solution enables them to create a self-fulfilling prophecy, using the mixed results to demonstrate that cloud just can’t hack it in the real world. 

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FINRA Commits Mission-Critical App To Amazon Cloud

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority moved its key market surveillance functionality onto EC2 in 2014, and is making plans to migrate the Oracle database it uses for registration from an internal data center to an AWS service.
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Up close with Amazon Snowball: Cloud migration for the data center

At the AWS re:Invent show, Network World’s Brandon Butler takes a closer look at the AWS Snowball offering. The ruggedized appliance helps enterprises migrate very large amounts of data to Amazon’s cloud.
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IDG Contributor Network: Cloud isn’t easy, but it needs to be

Over the past decade, I’ve witnessed a constant stream of IT executives and technology professionals view cloud as a threat to their careers. The business side of the organization has always been a captive customer of IT’s services, and now IT feels threatened by the litany of low-cost solutions readily available in the public cloud.  

Every once in a while IT begrudgingly agrees to implement a public cloud solution.  When the do, they carefully fence it off from the rest of IT—nominally to protect the company from hackers, but equally to protect the purity of IT. Treating cloud as a standalone point solution enables them to create a self-fulfilling prophecy, using the mixed results to demonstrate that cloud just can’t hack it in the real world. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

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AWS Lambda adds C# support

AWS Lambda, Amazon Web Services’ event-driven compute service in the cloud, is adding support for Microsoft’s C# language.

Using the .Net Core 1.0 runtime, developers can build AWS Lambda functions using C#. “The easiest way to get started is with the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio, which includes project templates for individual C# Lambda functions, full C# serverless applications, and also tools to publish both projects types to AWS,” Amazon said in a bulletin on Thursday morning.

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Mingis on Tech: Tech Trends for 2017

Up for discussion: The 10 most pressing and disruptive technologies for the year ahead, according to Computerworld’s Tech Forecast 2017 research.
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AWS is still a minnow — but it makes big waves

Amazon Web Services may no longer surpass 10X the utilized capacity of its next 14 closest competitors, thanks to a booming Microsoft Azure and signs of life at Google, but it’s still the $ 10 billion-plus gorilla in cloud computing. Ironically, this makes it a mere minnow in the grand scheme of enterprise IT. The overall IT market surpasses $ 4 trillion, with cloud (IaaS, SaaS, PaaS, and so on) accounting for only 10 percent of the total, as Apprenda executive Joseph Jacks reminds us.

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New partner programs for AWS are aimed at growing Alexa, IoT and more

While Amazon Web Services touts the self-service capabilities of its cloud, the company also works with a large number of channel partners to help companies migrate to and use its services.

The cloud provider announced a suite of updates to its partner programs at its Global Partner Summit in Las Vegas on Tuesday. The updates are focused on helping customers get increased use of Amazon’s cloud services and getting partners to invest further in AWS.

The keynote was an opportunity for the cloud provider to make a hard sell to the companies that will help businesses adopt Amazon’s cloud services. Partners shouldn’t hedge their investment in the public cloud, but should instead commit to supporting one provider deeply and aggressively, AWS CEO Andy Jassy said.

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Ricoh USA transforms ediscovery in the public cloud

For 80 years, Ricoh, the Japanese multinational that first saw light as Riken Sensitized Paper, has been known for manufacturing. But even with its long history, digital transformation hasn’t passed Ricoh by.

“While overall, we think of Ricoh as manufacturers for 80+ years, management of information has really been the focus of Ricoh for many years,” says David Greetham, vice president of eDiscovery, sales and operations for Ricoh USA, the company’s Malvern, Penn.-based North and South America arm.

Specializing in cameras and office electronics, Ricoh has manufactured copiers for Pitney-Bowes and Toshiba, Fax machines for AT&T and Omnifax, even the 8-bit processor used in the original Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Through the early 2000s, Ricoh grew to become the largest copier manufacturer in the world. It holds more than 46,000 patents for imaging and printing solutions, industrial products and digital cameras, and boasts 109,000 employees globally.

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New products of the week 11.28.16

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Japan plans superefficient supercomputer by 2017

Japan plans to build a super-efficient computer that could vault it to the top of the world’s supercomputer rankings by the end of next year.

With a processing capacity of 130 petaflops, the planned computer would outperform the current world leader, China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which delivers 93 petaflops. One petaflop is one million billion floating-point operations per second.

Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) isn’t just aiming to build the world’s fastest supercomputers, it also wants to make one of the most efficient. It is aiming for a power consumption of under 3 megawatts — a staggering figure, given that Japan’s current highest entry in the Top500 supercomputer list, Oakforest-PACS, delivers one-tenth the performance (13.6 petaflops) for the same power.

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AWS is cutting and simplifying its storage prices

Amazon Web Services made a series of price cuts on Tuesday and simplified what customers pay for its storage products. The company’s popular Simple Storage Service (S3) has had its six pricing tiers cut down to three, along with a corresponding price cut of roughly 16 percent to 25 percent.

Glacier, AWS’s storage service for data that doesn’t need to be accessed frequently, now has a trio of retrieval options. Companies can have quicker access to their data if they pay more or get cheaper access if they’re willing to wait. Glacier users also get a 43 percent price cut.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

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Japan plans superefficient supercomputer by 2017

Japan plans to build a super-efficient computer that could vault it to the top of the world’s supercomputer rankings by the end of next year.

With a processing capacity of 130 petaflops, the planned computer would outperform the current world leader, China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which delivers 93 petaflops. One petaflop is one million billion floating-point operations per second.

Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) isn’t just aiming to build the world’s fastest supercomputers, it also wants to make one of the most efficient. It is aiming for a power consumption of under 3 megawatts — a staggering figure, given that Japan’s current highest entry in the Top500 supercomputer list, Oakforest-PACS, delivers one-tenth the performance (13.6 petaflops) for the same power.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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ZoneSavvy taps big data to help SMBs find best sites for businesses

Location, location, location: As the old joke goes, those are the three keys to business success. Now, with big data analysis, corporations can be smarter than ever before about where to open up new offices or businesses.

But what if you run a mom-and-pop shop, or you’re dreaming of quitting your corporate job and opening a boutique? Even medium-size businesses do not have the money to spend on the sort of systems and analysis teams that corporate behemoths use to locate new businesses.

This is where ZoneSavvy, a new website created by software engineer Mike Wertheim, could help. The site is straightforward: You enter a business type, the ZIP code of the general area where you want to locate the business, and the distance from that ZIP code you are willing to consider. ZoneSavvy then gives you suggestions for which nearby neighborhoods would be the best locations for your business.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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ZoneSavvy taps big data to help SMBs find best sites for businesses

Location, location, location: As the old joke goes, those are the three keys to business success. Now, with big data analysis, corporations can be smarter than ever before about where to open up new offices or businesses.

But what if you run a mom-and-pop shop, or you’re dreaming of quitting your corporate job and opening a boutique? Even medium-size businesses do not have the money to spend on the sort of systems and analysis teams that corporate behemoths use to locate new businesses.

This is where ZoneSavvy, a new website created by software engineer Mike Wertheim, could help. The site is straightforward: You enter a business type, the ZIP code of the general area where you want to locate the business, and the distance from that ZIP code you are willing to consider. ZoneSavvy then gives you suggestions for which nearby neighborhoods would be the best locations for your business.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Predix, Digital Twin ‘Think’ About Operations Together

At GE’s Minds and Machines Nov. 15-16, GE illustrated how it’s using Predix and a ‘digital twin’ to solve turbine maintenance issues.
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AWS is cutting and simplifying its storage prices

Amazon Web Services made a series of price cuts on Tuesday and simplified what customers pay for its storage products. The company’s popular Simple Storage Service (S3) has had its six pricing tiers cut down to three, along with a corresponding price cut of roughly 16 percent to 25 percent.

Glacier, AWS’s storage service for data that doesn’t need to be accessed frequently, now has a trio of retrieval options. Companies can have quicker access to their data if they pay more or get cheaper access if they’re willing to wait. Glacier users also get a 43 percent price cut.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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IBM is on a push to offer IoT from development to production

The internet of things is so complex that some enterprises would rather turn to one vendor to determine the business case for an IoT deployment, design the system, roll it out, and operate it as a service.

At least that’s what IBM believes. The company’s combining several of its products and services into what it calls the IoT Solutions Practice. The move, announced Monday, is designed so customers can find all of IBM’s IoT offerings in one place.

Turning IoT into a service isn’t a new idea. Consultancies like Accenture and carriers like Verizon, among others, say they can reduce the complexity of adopting these systems and making them pay for themselves.

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7 reasons cloud migrations fail (free online course)

Cloud migrations can fail for a variety of reasons, such as a cloud strategy that isn’t aligned with business goals, cultural resistance or lack of a viable cloud security plan. Managing these migration risks is the focus of a free online course presented by training company Logical Operations Inc., in partnership with IDG Enterprise.

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(Insider Story)
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